Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Venus Verticordia

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Venus Verticordia


Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Lady Lilith

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Lady Lilith

John William Waterhouse
A Mermaid
1900

This painting was Waterhouse’s diploma work for the Royal Academy.
A mermaid (masculine Merman) was a fabled marine creature with the head and upper body of a human being and the tail of a fish. Similar divine or semidivine beings appear in ancient mythologies (e.g., the Chaldean sea god Ea, or Oannes). In European folklore, mermaids (sometimes called sirens) and mermen were natural beings who, like fairies, had magical and prophetic powers. They loved music and often sang. Though very long-lived, they were mortal and had no souls.
Many folktales record marriages between mermaids (who might assume human form) and men. In most, the man steals the mermaid’s cap or belt, her comb or mirror. While the objects are hidden she lives with him; if she finds them she returns at once to the sea. In some variants the marriage lasts while certain agreed-upon conditions are fulfilled, and it ends when the conditions are broken.
Though sometimes kindly, mermaids and mermen were usually dangerous to man. Their gifts brought misfortune, and, if offended, the beings caused floods or other disasters. To see one on a voyage was an omen of shipwreck. They sometimes lured mortals to death by drowning, as did the Lorelei of the Rhine, or enticed young people to live with them underwater, as did the mermaid whose image is carved on a bench in the church of Zennor, Cornwall, Eng.

John William Waterhouse

A Mermaid

1900

This painting was Waterhouse’s diploma work for the Royal Academy.

A mermaid (masculine Merman) was a fabled marine creature with the head and upper body of a human being and the tail of a fish. Similar divine or semidivine beings appear in ancient mythologies (e.g., the Chaldean sea god Ea, or Oannes). In European folklore, mermaids (sometimes called sirens) and mermen were natural beings who, like fairies, had magical and prophetic powers. They loved music and often sang. Though very long-lived, they were mortal and had no souls.

Many folktales record marriages between mermaids (who might assume human form) and men. In most, the man steals the mermaid’s cap or belt, her comb or mirror. While the objects are hidden she lives with him; if she finds them she returns at once to the sea. In some variants the marriage lasts while certain agreed-upon conditions are fulfilled, and it ends when the conditions are broken.

Though sometimes kindly, mermaids and mermen were usually dangerous to man. Their gifts brought misfortune, and, if offended, the beings caused floods or other disasters. To see one on a voyage was an omen of shipwreck. They sometimes lured mortals to death by drowning, as did the Lorelei of the Rhine, or enticed young people to live with them underwater, as did the mermaid whose image is carved on a bench in the church of Zennor, Cornwall, Eng.

Frank Cadogan Cowper
Rapunzel
1900

Frank Cadogan Cowper

Rapunzel

1900

Arthur Hughes
Ophelia and He Will Not Come Again

Arthur Hughes

Ophelia and He Will Not Come Again

Jules-Joseph Lefebvre
Mary Magdalene in the Grotto

Jules-Joseph Lefebvre

Mary Magdalene in the Grotto

Arthur Hughes
In the Grass

Arthur Hughes

In the Grass

Lucien Levy-Dhurmer
Eve
1896

Lucien Levy-Dhurmer

Eve

1896

Ernest Hebert
Ophelia
1876

Ernest Hebert

Ophelia

1876

Wladyslaw Podkowinski
Frenzy of Exultations
1894
National Museum, Krakow
310 x 275
Oil on canvas
Frenzy of Exultations, or better known as just Frenzy, is an 1893 painting by Polish artist Wladyslaw Podkowinski. It is considered the first work of symbolism in Polish art. The concept of this work dates back to Podkowiński’s stay in Paris in 1889, but the emergence of successive oil sketches and charcoal studies in the second half of 1893 was the consequence of the growing drama of unrequited love in the artist’s life. In his vision, Podkowiński elevates erotic ecstasy to an absolute value, regarding it, in accordance with the psychologism current for that time, as the cosmic power and determinant of the human condition. Setting about the execution of the huge painting, he employed the academic method of preparatory sketches that correspond to the final version while differing slightly one from another in size and colour. 

Wladyslaw Podkowinski

Frenzy of Exultations

1894

National Museum, Krakow

310 x 275

Oil on canvas

Frenzy of Exultations, or better known as just Frenzy, is an 1893 painting by Polish artist Wladyslaw Podkowinski. It is considered the first work of symbolism in Polish art. The concept of this work dates back to Podkowiński’s stay in Paris in 1889, but the emergence of successive oil sketches and charcoal studies in the second half of 1893 was the consequence of the growing drama of unrequited love in the artist’s life. In his vision, Podkowiński elevates erotic ecstasy to an absolute value, regarding it, in accordance with the psychologism current for that time, as the cosmic power and determinant of the human condition. Setting about the execution of the huge painting, he employed the academic method of preparatory sketches that correspond to the final version while differing slightly one from another in size and colour.